cafe

Using a Moka Pot

What it is. A moka pot (Invented by the Italian company, Bialetti), also known as a stovetop espresso maker, does not really make "espresso" in the traditional sense of the word, but it does produce a small amount of very full-bodied, rich coffee.

Gather your ingredients. You will need a stovetop coffee maker with a clean filter, you Perucchi Coffee, and a cup.

Fill the bottom of the pot with water. Fill as full as the pot indicates, for best results. Fill the filter. Drop the filter into the bottom section of the pot, and fill it with the ground coffee. Level it off with your finger or the handle of a spoon. Screw on the top section. Re-assemble the stovetop brewer, being careful not to spill either coffee or water.

Place the pot on the burner on medium or low heat. Make sure the handle is not directly over the heating element, be it gas or electric!

Remove when done. As the water comes to a boil, coffee will begin to fill the upper section. It will start out dark, and then lighten up as the brewing progresses. When the coffee stream becomes pale or blonde, remove the brewer from the stove. Be careful—it will be hot!

Serve and enjoy. When the brewing has stopped, serve your coffee as desired. Pour any extra into a thermal carafe to keep it tasting good.

Coffee plantation

Using a standard coffee maker

Gather your ingredients. You will need a coffee maker with a clean carafe and filter, your coffee and a cup.

Place the filter into the brewing basket. Following the instructions for your particular coffee maker, use the right size filter and place in the basket. If it's removable, you can rinse the filter and basket in hot water to remove any paper flavor.

There are also reusable gold filters available for many coffee makers. These cut down on paper waste, add no flavor at all to the brew, and are easily cleaned.

Add the coffee. Most coffee makers like to have about 2 tablespoons (30 ml) per cup. Adjust this proportion to taste: stronger coffee means more coffee, lighter coffee means less. If you brew it too strong, you can always add some hot water to your cup.Fill the reservoir. Use the carafe as a measuring cup by filling it with the appropriate amount of water for the amount of coffee you have used. (Most coffee pots have measurements on the side.)

Turn it on. Press the On or Power button/switch. After a minute or two as the machine pre-heats the water, your coffee should begin brewing. Some machines brew quickly, but others brew slowly. Slow isn't actually all bad though; it gives the end result a more rounded flavor. The coffee is done when you stop hearing bubbling sounds. Drink up! Pour yourself a cup and add cream and/or sugar if desired.

cafe

Using a French Press

Gather your ingredients. You will need a French press (aka press pot), your Perucchi coffee, a wooden or plastic spoon, a timer, and cups.

Add coffee to the carafe. Put the coffee directly into a clean, dry carafe. A good rule of thumb is one tablespoon of coffee for every cup of water. A 4-cup press, then, would get 4 tablespoons of coffee.

Bring the water just to a boil. Pour it into the carafe, moving the stream around to saturate all the coffee, until it's about an inch under the top metal ring. Leaving room at the top allows the grounds to expand, or bloom, and form crema, that foamy topping you usually see on espresso.

Start a timer. The key to a great cup of coffee from a French press is timing. Set your timer for 4 minutes, and when you are done with the previous step, start your timer.

At the 1-minute mark, stir the grounds to break down the bloom and distribute the grounds evenly. Top off the carafe with near-boiling water, filling it to the top of the top metal ring. Avoid using a metal spoon, which could lead to accidental breakage. Instead, use a wooden or plastic spoon or stir-stick. Lacquered chopsticks work well for this, too.

Put a lid on it. Place the vented lid and press assembly onto the carafe, making sure the vented portion of the top is aligned with the lip of the carafe. Press! At the 4-minute bell, gently but firmly press the plunger down to the bottom. This will filter out the coffee, and stop the brewing process.

Note: should you forget to stir at the 1 minute mark, you may find this step difficult. Do not force the plunger down, simply pull it back up a bit, then repeat, working your way down. Forcing it could result in breakage, which could result in a real mess—and you will not have even had your first cup of coffee for the day!

Pour and enjoy. Pour what you can into your cup, and pour the rest into a thermal carafe to keep it hot and tasty. Add cream, sugar, and flavorings to taste.

Coffee plantation

Using a Chemex Brewer

Gather your ingredients. You will need a Chemex brewer, filter, Perucchi Coffee, and cups.

Set and rinse the filter. Place a folded Chemex filter into the cone of the carafe, with the folds toward the spout.

Pour hot water through the filter to remove any paper flavor, and preheat the carafe. Let the water drain completely, and then pour it out. Keep the filter sealed against the walls of the cone.

Add the coffee. Pour 6 tablespoons of Perucchi Coffee into the filter. Bloom the grounds. Bring the water just to a boil, and pour only just enough into the filter to saturate the grounds. Move the stream of water around to saturate all the grounds evenly, but avoid pouring too much—you want very little water actually dripping through on the first pour. Let bloom for about 30 seconds.

Fill the cone. Pour water around the cone, breaking down the bloom and saturating all the coffee evenly. Fill the cone till the water's about 1⁄4 inch (0.6 cm) from the top, and let the water filter through the coffee, into the carafe.

The third pour. When you see about an inch of coffee ground clinging to the sides of the filter, fill the cone again, pouring around the sides to wash off the dry grounds back into the mix, and fill to the top of the cone.

Remove the filter. When the water has filtered through, remove the filter and put it where it can finish draining without making a mess.

Drink up! Serve your coffee, creamed and sweetened and flavored to your tastes.

cafe

Using a Single Cup Cone

Gather your ingredients. You will need a single-cup cone, matching filter (generally a Melitta #2), your Perucchi Coffee, a waste cup for spillover, and of course, a mug.

Set and rinse the filter. Place the cone onto the cup. Fold the filter at its seam, and place in the cone. Run hot water over the filter to rinse out any paper flavor and preheat cone and cup. Make sure you drain both completely before brewing the coffee! Add the coffee grounds. Add about 3 tablespoons of ground coffee to the filter.

Bloom the grounds. Bring the water just to a boil, and pour only just enough into the filter to saturate the coffee grounds. Move the stream of water around to saturate all the coffee grounds evenly, but avoid pouring too much—you want very little water actually dripping through on the first pour. Let bloom for about 30 seconds.

Fill the cone. Pour water around the cone, breaking down the bloom and saturating all the coffee grounds evenly. Fill the cone till the water's just about at the top of the cone, and let the water filter through the coffee, into the cup.

Take your cup of coffee. When it's about full, quickly move the cone from your drinking cup to the waste cup so that it can finish dripping through.